Tag Archives: bring your own device

Best practices for BYOD in education

BYOD best practiceBradford Networks, an organisation that has been at the forefront of network security in the education sector since 2000, recently commissioned a survey of 500 institutions in the education sector to gauge attitudes towards bring your own device (BYOD). It may be great for enabling new ways of learning, teaching and collaborating, but BYOD presents a number of challenges for the IT department, with security remaining the number one concern.

Based on extensive experience developed from helping over 600 educational institutions, Bradford Networks recommends the following best practices when developing a BYOD solution: Continue reading

Has your school joined the BYOD movement?

UK2-BYOD-ImageLaptops, tablets and smart phones are now commonplace in our daily lives. There’s a variety available on the market and everyone has a preference. Once upon a time these devices may have been used primarily for personal use, but now we expect to use them anywhere, in everything we do to make our lives easier. It’s this expectation that has driven the trend towards bring your own device (BYOD). Continue reading

Considerations for BYOD

BYODI’ve been engaging with some clients of late who have all started to use the phrase ‘bring your own device’ (BYOD).

It’s a great concept, and your favourite search engine will produce articles from VMware, Aruba (Dell re-brand its wireless and network access control (NAC) technology), Deloitte, HP and others with a total of about 82.5 million search results returned.

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The benefit of end-user computing

The benefit of end-user computingWhat consumes the majority of an IT department’s time on any given day?
Backup issues?
Change requests?
Or maybe end-user support?
If you chose the latter, you would not be alone. End-user support is the one of the most difficult IT costs to quantify; it’s difficult to measure, impossible to predict, and issues that occur are often classed as high severity, meaning resources may be pulled from project work or scheduled tasks to support the problem.

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